Durdle Door on The Jurassic Coast in Dorset, England
A stone sign near Durdle Door on The Jurassic Coast in Dorset, England
Pebbles on The Jurassic Coast in Dorset, England
The Coastal Path on The Jurassic Coast in Dorset, England
Corfe Castle on The Jurassic Coast in Dorset, England
A street in Worth Matraves on The Jurassic Coast in Dorset, England
West Bay Beach on The Jurassic Coast in Dorset, England
Wareham on The Jurassic Coast in Dorset, England
St Alban's Chapel on The Jurassic Coast in Dorset, England
Durdle Door on The Jurassic Coast in Dorset, EnglandA stone sign near Durdle Door on The Jurassic Coast in Dorset, EnglandPebbles on The Jurassic Coast in Dorset, EnglandThe Coastal Path on The Jurassic Coast in Dorset, EnglandCorfe Castle on The Jurassic Coast in Dorset, EnglandA street in Worth Matraves on The Jurassic Coast in Dorset, EnglandWest Bay Beach on The Jurassic Coast in Dorset, EnglandWareham on The Jurassic Coast in Dorset, EnglandSt Alban's Chapel on The Jurassic Coast in Dorset, England

  • 4.Follow Dorset’s coastal path

    There are around 100 miles of rolling coastal tracks that follow the attractive Dorset coastline and are on offer to those who love to explore on foot.

    You can tailor a Jurassic coastal walk to fit your stamina and time available. Some enthusiasts have been known to walk the whole length, seeking shelter for the night in nearby seaside towns and villages.

    Others choose a particular section that will also become their return journey or head to a point where they can pick up the X53 Jurassic Coast Bus to deliver them back to their car or the public transport of Exeter and Pool.

    Points of interest along the way include the famous Lulworth Cove, the alluring Durdle Door and adjoining Man O’War Cove, the cliffs of White Nothe, Golden Cap and the Isle of Portland.

    It is hard to pick a favourite spot but the 2-3 hour walk from Ringstead Bay to Lulworth Cove is particularly scenic.

  • For a day outing, park the car at the National Trust car park near Ringstead Bay then take the path past Durdle Door and Man O’War Cove, arriving at Lulworth Cove for lunch and return the same way.

    Keep in mind the path demands a reasonable level of fitness and being so close to the coast expect certain sections to be quite windy.

    5.Walk the ramparts of Britain’s largest Iron Age fort

    As if caused by an enormous pebble dropped in a stream, the earthen moats surrounding Maiden Castle’s hill fort ripple outward from where this Iron Age village once stood.

    The hill mound and chalk moat defences are all that remain of a once thriving Iron Age village that would have dominated this part of the Dorset countryside for miles around.

    Archaeologist estimate the hilltop was first inhabited around 4000 BC and by 500 BC it had grown to be home to several hundred people.

  • The multiple ramparts of the fort enclose an area equivalent to 50 football pitches which is now home to flocks of resident grazing sheep.

    We loved the views of the rolling countryside that extend out in every direction and picturing what life must have been like, living in this fort 2,500 years ago.

    There is a short but steep track from the car park to the top of the Maiden Castle. The top of the hill fort is surprisingly large and to walk around it can take 30 – 45 minutes.

    The ramparts of the Iron Age Maiden Castle in Dorset UK

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4 August 2012